Home
 About COBSEA
 Current Activities
 Projects
UNEP/GEF South China Sea Project 
SIDA Spatial Planning
YEOSU Coastal Erosion
 Events
 Links - Marine Actors
 Publications
 Contact
 Search

Home:Projects

SIDA Spatial Planning Project

bar s

COBSEA Sida Spatial Planning in the Coastal Zone – Disaster Prevention and Sustainable Development Project

Project Background

The Indian-Ocean Tsunami that took place on 25 December 2004 had devastating impacts in 12 countries around the Indian Ocean, causing almost 230,000 human lives and massive damages to property, infrastructure and coastal ecosystems. This event highlighted the need for effective coastal zone development and planning. Soon after, the UNEP Tsunami Disaster Task Force adopted the “Guiding Principles for Post-Tsunami Rehabilitation and Reconstruction” (referred to as the Cairo Guiding Principles). One important aspect of the Cairo Guiding Principles is the concept of spatial planning and setback lines in the coastal zone in order to reduce the vulnerability of coastal communities to natural hazards.

The original project proposal was developed during 2006 in order to address the challenge of sustainable development in coastal areas in the East Asian Seas region through applying some of the recommendations outlined in the Cairo Guiding Principles. The proposal acknowledged that the use of tools like spatial planning and setback lines is not limited to Tsunami affected countries, but is applicable to the entire region for minimizing the impact of natural disasters and in achieving environmentally sustainable and socio-economically equitable coastal development. In early 2009, the project proposal was approved for funding by Sida.

Since the development of the project proposal, the challenges that countries are facing in relation to the impacts of climate change and sea level rise have become increasingly apparent. Coastal areas are extremely vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, and it is necessary to respond to these threats and attempt to minimize the vulnerability of coastal ecosystems and communities.

  

After its approval, the project was modernized to integrate the concepts of climate change adaptation, sea-level rise, ecosystem approach and results based management into the project. In addition, it was also agreed that the project would be implemented in COBSEA developing countries.

The project has a total cost of USD 1,120,000 and has a duration of 3 years from 1st January 2010 to 31st December 2012. The project will be implemented in six of the COBSEA member countries: Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam, with the COBSEA Secretariat will assuming the role of the implementing organization and will oversee the project implementation.

  

Objectives and Outcomes

The overall goal of the project is to reduce and prevent the impacts of natural disasters, climate change and sea level rise and to promote sustainable development of the coastal areas in COBSEA member countries through the application of spatial planning for integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) and Ecosystem Based Management (EBM).

In achieving the overall goal, the specific objectives are:

  • To develop a Regional Resource and Guidance Document and to adapt it to six COBSEA countries through building national capacities in integrating new management concepts into spatial planning in the coastal zone;
  • To conduct national consultations and gap analyses with six COBSEA countries and to identify priorities for capacity building in integrating new management concepts into spatial planning;
  • To strengthen national capacities in coastal spatial planning and integrated coastal management through the national adaptation and application of the Regional Resource and Guidance Document.  

The main outputs of the project are expected to include the following:

  • Regional Resource and Guidance Document for the integration of new management concepts such as climate change, ecosystem-based management, disaster risk reduction and results-based management into spatial planning and coastal zone management procedures and processes.
  • Menu of possible capacity building and field application activities including a recommended outline for the workshops and training courses.
  • Series of national consultations including consultations summaries with each participating country.
  • Country-tailored capacity building and field application activities based on the needs and priorities of each country.
  • National adaptation of capacity building and field application activities of each country.
  • Regional workshop to synthesize the outcomes of all national adaptation activities and integrate best practices into the final regional document.

 

Project Phases and Activities

The project implementation will be divided into three phases over a period of three years:

Phase 1 - Producing a Regional Resource and Guidance Document for the integration of new concepts, such as climate change, disaster risk reduction, ecosystem-based management and results-based management into existing coastal spatial planning policies and procedures.

The Regional Guidelines will focus on the integration and mainstreaming of these new concepts into spatial planning and setback lines management to assist countries in the prevention and reduction of the impacts of natural disasters, climate change and sea-level rise. The activities are:

Phase 2 - National consultations and planning of national adaptation of the Regional Resource Document

This phase will focus on the planning of national adaptation of the generic Regional Document to national settings and needs, upon consultations with the six participating countries. The activities are:

Phase 3 - Capacity building, national adaptation, demonstrations

This phase will focus on capacity building and adaptation activities (of the Regional Resource Document). This phase will be based on the results of the consultations, needs analysis and priorities of the participating countries and will be ‘tailor-made’ to each of the participating countries.

 

Project Progress to Date

Phase 1 - Producing a Regional Resource and Guidance Document
           

  • Produced a Regional Resource Document ‘Spatial Planning in the Coastal Zone of the East Asian Seas Region: Integrating Emerging Issues and Modern Management Approaches’ (Interim Edition, November 2011) which integrates emerging issues such as climate change and sea-level rise, and new management concepts such as ecosystem-based management, disaster risk reduction and results-based management into spatial planning and coastal zone management procedures and processes.

  

  • Developed a Training and Capacity Building for Coastal Spatial Planning in the East Asian Seas Region:  ‘Menu and Syllabus’ (September 2011) which provides a ‘menu’ of possible capacity-building options or approaches that will serve as basis for the national consultation with participating COBSEA countries in identifying their country-specific needs and priorities for training and capacity building activities.

 

Phase 2 - National consultations and planning of national adaptation of the Regional Resource Document

  • Organized six (6) national consultation meetings (November-December 2011) with reports on the identified and prioritized capacity building activities, and corresponding implementation schemes (work plan and budget) for each participating country.

  

  • Five out of six countries identified common capacity building needs such as i) the desire to begin national adaptation with a ‘Train-the-Trainer’ course; ii) the translation and adaptation of the RRD into national setting; iii)  the development of national training manuals and – iv) organization of national training courses. The Philippines opted for a different approach which will involve updating and amending existing national technical/legal spatial planning guidebooks.

  

 

Phase 3 - Capacity building, national adaptation, demonstrations

  • Organized a Regional Train-the-Trainer Course on Spatial Planning in the Coastal and Marine Zone of the EAS Region was held on May 14-18 2012 in Phuket, Thailand to build the capacity of national teams from six participating countries, in how to integrate emerging issues and modern management approaches into their national spatial planning processes and regimes. A total of 34 participants from six countries were instructed in English by three international experts with four key regional resource documents as reference training materials. These national trainers will conduct similar training programs in their own countries and languages, with tailored course syllabi and curricula which the participants developed during the course.

  

  • Developed six national training syllabus and curriculum which will be translated into local languages and used for national training courses.
  • Established six national teams of instructors that have the knowledge and capacity to design and conduct national training programs in their own countries and languages, with sufficient understanding of the emerging issues and modern management approaches related to coastal and marine spatial planning and sustainable development.

 

  • Started the translation and adaptation of the Regional Resource Document into national setting to help local planners, researchers, students, and national authorities on relevant information on coastal spatial planning in the country.

 

Know more on Coastal Spatial Planning

What is Spatial Planning?

Spatial planning is one of the major tools used for coastal management than can be defined as “coherent and integrated intervention in the allocation of limited land areas for various uses taking into account the needs for socio-economic development and environmental protection”.

Spatial planning typically includes mapping of species and habitats, ecosystems drivers and their variability, mapping of human activities and related zoning of coastal areas for multiple specific uses.

Different management interventions made be defined for each specific zone considering the vulnerability to natural disasters and sea level rise, specific ecosystem features and social and economic dimensions.

In defining the different zones, a setback line is used to regulate the construction in the coastal areas closest to the sea. In general, setback lines are determined in order to prevent potential negative environmental impacts from construction activities. Development activities behind the setback lines are allowed, but only in accordance to certain management measures such as environmental impact assessments, and other relevant laws and regulations.

COBSEA | UNEP | Regional Seas
Copyright © 2005 COBSEA - Coordinating Body on the Seas of East Asia